mnot’s blog

Design depends largely on constraints.” — Charles Eames

Sunday, 19 August 2018

Do you Trust Australia? Part Three

Not that long ago, the US government attempted to compel Microsoft to reveal a customer's data that was located in Ireland.

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Thursday, 16 August 2018

Do you Trust Australia? Part Two

After a couple of sleeps, I think my concerns about the proposed Assistance and Access Bill 2018 have crystallised.

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Tuesday, 14 August 2018

Do you Trust Australia?

This morning, the Australian Department of Home Affairs released the Assistance and Access Bill 2018 for consultation.

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Tuesday, 31 July 2018

How to Read an RFC

For better or worse, Requests for Comments (RFCs) are how we specify many protocols on the Internet. These documents are alternatively treated as holy texts by developers who parse them for hidden meanings, then shunned as irrelevant because they can’t be understood. This often leads to frustration and – more significantly – interoperability and security issues.

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Wednesday, 7 June 2017

How (Not) to Control Your CDN

In February, Omer Gil described the Web Cache Deception Attack.

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Thursday, 11 May 2017

How to Think About HTTP Status Codes

There’s more than a little confusion and angst out there about HTTP status codes. I’ve received more than a few e-mails (and IMs, and DMs) over the years from stressed-out developers (once at 2am, their time!) asking something like this:

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Thursday, 16 March 2017

The State of Browser Caching, Revisited

A long, long time ago, I wrote some tests using XmlHttpRequest to figure out how well browser caches behaved, and wrote up the results.

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Friday, 22 April 2016

Ideal HTTP Performance

The implicit goal for Web performance is to reduce end-user perceived latency; to get the page in front of the user and interactive as soon as possible.

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Wednesday, 9 March 2016

Alternative Services

The IESG has approved “HTTP Alternative Services” for publication as a Proposed Standard.

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Friday, 18 December 2015

Why 451?

Today, the IESG approved publication of “An HTTP Status Code to Report Legal Obstacles”. It’ll be an RFC after some work by the RFC Editor and a few more process bits, but effectively you can start using it now.

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